My Topics

Moniek Buijzen

Digital media technologies offer unprecedented opportunities to improve youth’s well-being, including message personalization, responsive data feedback, and social network intervention. However, there are also risks involved, such as undesired health effects and breaches of privacy and autonomy. Moniek Buijzen’s research investigates how we can harness the potential of digital media technology to improve young people’s well-being, while minimizing potential risks. She strives for a continuous interaction between scientific research and innovative technological applications.

Moniek Buijzen is Professor of Communication and Behavioural Change in the Erasmus School of Social and Behavioural Sciences at the Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Her research is funded by grants from the European Research Council (ERC) and the Dutch Science Foundation (NWO). In addition to her research and teaching activities, Moniek focuses on bridging the academy-society divide. With academic partner Esther Rozendaal she initiated Bitescience.com.

16 June 2021
Health and Wellbeing

Peer influencers can promote water drinking among classmates

16 April 2021
Youth communication, Journalism and news

Chatting with peers does not help children in coping with negative news

22 March 2021
Social media, Health and Wellbeing, Youth communication

Reduce Online Aggressive Behaviors Among Teens? Make Them Feel Accountable!

2 March 2021
Social media, Health and Wellbeing, Youth communication

Why do teens forward nasty messages on WhatsApp?

15 February 2021
Advertising and Marketing, Media policy

How the design of cookie pop-ups manipulates our choices

21 January 2021
Health and Wellbeing, Journalism and news

Can people separate fact from fiction in the COVID-19 pandemic?

9 December 2020
Health and Wellbeing, Youth communication, Media technology and AI

Active teens, happy teens?

18 May 2020
Advertising and Marketing, Social media, Youth communication

Disclosures do not always make influencer marketing more transparent to children

19 March 2020
Social media, Health and Wellbeing, Youth communication

Influencers can sway children to drink unhealthy beverages

19 February 2020
Health and Wellbeing, Journalism and news

Do people believe what they want to believe? Scientific facts matter!

10 January 2020
Social media, Health and Wellbeing, Youth communication

Can watching vlogs created by peers make youth more physically active?

30 August 2019
Health and Wellbeing, Youth communication, Media technology and AI

Finding the Most Effective Peer Influencers Using Computer Simulations

9 August 2019
Social media, Health and Wellbeing

Using Social Media To Combat Empty Nest Syndrome

3 July 2019
Advertising and Marketing, Health and Wellbeing, Youth communication, Media policy

Healthy food porn – Using strategies from the snack world to create healthy cravings

12 June 2019
Health and Wellbeing, Youth communication, Media technology and AI

Healthy eating through gaming?

30 January 2019
Youth communication, Journalism and news

Reporting Negative News to Children: Finding the Balance Between Informing and Shielding

28 January 2019
Social media, Media technology and AI

Receiving An SMS Feels Distracting, But Does Not Lead To Worse Performance

28 January 2019
Health and Wellbeing, Youth communication

Students Drink Less Alcohol When They Persuade Themselves To Do So

22 January 2019
Lifestyle and entertainment

Serial Killer Dexter Can Help Discuss Professional Moral Dilemmas

7 June 2018
Health and Wellbeing, Youth communication, Media technology and AI

Can a Smartphone App Train Peer Influencers to Promote Physical Activity Among Their Peers?